The Baby Items You Don't Really Need

Baby Registry

We often times see blog posts about the things that we "need" when having a baby or registering for a baby shower, but rarely do we see posts about the things we don't need. 

Well, I am all for as little stuff as possible (even though I still have lots compared to others I'm sure), so today I am giving you a treat on the baby products that are often rarely used and just take up space and collect dust!

First off, I totally get that you're over the moon excited and the first thing that you want to do is run to register for tons of fancy things that Babies R Us and Pinterest tells you that you need. I.WAS.YOU. I had the handy checklist and registered for nearly everything on there. I hoped for it all and was blessed with nearly all of it; but as the days and babies have passed by, I have slowly donated off the things that I really didn't need or use. 

There's numerous reasons why you should consider being practical rather than over the top and here's just a few:

  • Saves space. Especially if you live in a small home with little storage like me. The more you have the more cluttered your home will feel and look. Add in a few months or a year when your baby is now a toddler and has a slew of toys, and suddenly you don't have room for anything! 
  • It can be unhealthy. Lots of baby products and toys are made of plastics that are filled with chemicals that can off gas into your home. The air within our homes is highly toxic compared to the air outdoors (this is proven by research). While it is very hard to steer clear of all plastic (I surely don't), too much is not very healthy and eco friendly. 
  • It's costly. Some items operate on batteries and it's a constant struggle to keep enough batteries on hand or to replace parts. Not to mention if you buy the items yourself to begin with, it's very costly! 
  • There's other things you need MORE. Like um, diapers and wipes. I know those are not exciting, but if more people gave you those as gifts, then you'd spend less money in the long run and children wouldn't seem "so expensive" as some like to say. 

So what are some items you don't really need? Remember, this post is based off of my opinions and experiences so take it how you'd like! 

  • Too many seats, bouncers and swings. ONE good one will do. If you can splurge to get the newer models that swing and vibrate then just rely on that one. There is no need to have a bouncer/vibrator seat and a swing. The only time this is handy is in larger homes where one can be placed in another room. In this event, I totally recommend a portable swing that is small and compact. 
  • A fancy changing station. This area is usually only good for until baby begins to roll which is usually around 3-4 months. By that time, it is easier to just grab a changing pad and change on the floor with a diaper caddy. This allows you to change anywhere in the home and saves you space in the nursery. 
  • A walker AND a jumper contraption. Those jumpers are VERY large. You underestimate their size in the store and once it is in your home it totally clashes and is freaking huge. I recommend choosing one, and personally I like that a walker can fold up and be stored away when not in use and can easily be placed in any room. 
  • Too many rash creams. Just stick to one good, natural one. There's no need to confuse the bum with different ones!
  • Too many clothes. Especially in the newborn days, they grow super fast! I recommend buying more larger sizes and registering for a mixture of sizes. However I truly recommend to not register for any clothes as you'll receive plenty. 
  • More than two strollers. Numerous times I have checked out registries only to find like three strollers. You need one stroller that is compatible with your carseat and one inexpensive umbrella stroller. AND if you really want to get away with less, instead of the compatible stroller and carseat get the stroller carseat stand that is inexpensive and small (carseat just hooks into it) and then invest in an umbrella stroller with a harness (shoulder and waist buckles). You can easily move a baby into an umbrella stroller with a harness type closure around six months old. Unless you're a serious jogger, do not register for a jogger stroller. Like really, just don't. 
  • Too many bibs and burp cloths. If you plan to breastfeed these items will rarely get used. Just an FYI. 
  • Too many newborn mittens and hats. The concept is cute, but my girls never wore those little newborn mittens. We just didn't need them even though I had like 5 pairs and many of them organic. Total waste of my money. They also only wore the hats for about 1-2 weeks total, but they also were not winter babies so there's that. 
  • An obnoxious floor gym. Sure all of the lights and sounds and colors look like fun, but when it's sitting there it's super clashy, very much in the way and actually too much stimulation from lights and sounds can be dangerous to a baby's development. I recommend a wooden gym such as this one. We have it and it takes up less space, looks great in my home and I found that baby number two enjoyed this MUCH MORE than baby number one enjoyed her fancy, obnoxious floor gym. 
  • An expensive diaper bag. Here's why: because it will get stains from sitting on restaurant floors, it will have bottles of milk spill in it, it will hold dirty clothes and it will get dingy looking and may be "spot clean" only. Not to mention that by like 9-12 months old, you'll find it easier to carry a little backpack. I'm telling you, don't do it. 

There's probably several other items that I could list, but right now these are the ones that stand out the most. And again, this is just my opinions and experiences. If you want all the baby items, then mama you get them. 

But at the end of the day, babies need diapers, wipes, a few good outfits, some blankets and a good place to sleep and a warm place to eat. And of course, they need oodles and oodles of love! 

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Sasha Savoy

Sasha is the owner and founder of The Mushy Mommy, a natural mother and baby boutique and The Mushy Mommy Village. She is a SAHM who works hard at living as minimal and unprocessed as possible, but never claims perfection. Her mission is to inspire, encourage, enlighten and empower mothers all over to feel good about their choices, to make healthy choices and to enjoy motherhood and all of its beauty and chaos.